On Fire

Numb fingers

tingle, hands burning

What’s the deal

You’re failing

After all these years typing

How could you do this

*

Getting old

Tendon overload

Short circuits

Jolting pain

You click away, wrist lights up

Can’t stop now

*

Fingers, please don’t fail me

You must help

I’ll slow down

You still have more words to type

Carpal tunnel hurts

Today at d’Verse, Grace asked us to write a poem personifying a body part. I chose to write about my hand that seems to be developing carpal tunnel syndrome. My fingers get numb and sometimes I wake up in the night with my hand feeling like it is on fire. I have cut back on my typing, switched to my left hand for the mouse, got a wrist brace, and do some exercises to stretch out the tendons. It is much better that it was a couple of months ago.

Today I am trying the Shadorma form for my poetry for the first time. I hope I got it right!

Join us at: https://dversepoets.com

Backspacing

How many of you remember using one of these?

*

Fated to live retracing steps taken

Backspacing becomes the norm

A brain one wire short of perfection

Requires backspacing to be the norm

In bygone days erasures quickly met metal

Pen and ink scratched out those shorts

Some keep asking // thinking I should learn

But for me backspacing is the norm

Distractions, only a second past, causes forgetfulness

A mind with a missing memory chip

Seems repetition should solve the problem

But with me backspacing is the norm

Reminders in multiples of ten are needed

Lamenting the need to repeat again and again

Brings no healing to a chipless brain

For me backspacing is the norm

Names go through my canals // beat the anvils

And pass right on through // unless

Piggy-backed on another file //stored there for awhile

It may seem like I don’t care // and sometimes I am not aware

Forgetfulness becomes my greatest flaw

When I am old // perhaps I’ll be excused

They’ll call it Alzheimer’s …and lock me away

Saying for him backspacing is all he ever does

*****

Stamp Art: Dwight L. Roth