Waiting for the Light

Today is Advent Sunday in the Christian faith. It represents the time leading up to the birth of Christ, Emanuel, God with us. The prophet Isaiah spoke of coming out of darkness and into the light. It speaks so much to the feelings of our life this past year.

“The people walking in darkness
    have seen a great light;
on those living in the land of deep darkness
    a light has dawned.”

Isaiah 9:2 NIV (biblegateway.com)

My Nephew’s wife shared the following post this morning on her Face Book page. I thought is was so well written that I wanted to share it with you.

**********************

Advent feels different this year… it’s not just about me preparing my heart for the coming Christ-child.

Most of us have spent a significant amount of time this year sitting in the darkness of our own personal waiting rooms…waiting for healing, waiting for a job, waiting for pregnancy, waiting for reconciliation, waiting for a visit from family, waiting for lab results, waiting for “normal”, etc.

So instead of trying to ignore the darkness, I will wait a little longer, hoping that “the God who showed up in the hardest parts of our humanity is still showing up today…

…We often forget that the encounter with the incarnate Christ happens in unexpected places — our unexpected change of plans, our unaccomplished dreams, and humble new beginnings.” (Scott Erickson)

I’m looking forward to the day “the weary world rejoices” again.

~Lora Myers Roth~

Photo: Dwight L. Roth

13 thoughts on “Waiting for the Light

      • This is the tradition of Advent that I am familiar with, although there are variations that extend to the the advent of the second coming of Christ.

        The Advent wreath, or Advent crown, is a Christian tradition that symbolizes the passage of the four weeks of Advent in the liturgical calendar of the Western church. It is traditionally a Lutheran practice, although it has spread to many other Christian denominations.[1][2][3]

        It is an evergreen wreath with four candles, sometimes with a fifth, white candle in the center. Beginning with the First Sunday of Advent, the lighting of a candle can be accompanied by a Bible reading, devotional time and prayers.[4][5] An additional candle is lit on each subsequent Sunday until, by the last Sunday of Advent, all four candles are lit. Some Advent wreaths include a fifth, Christ candle which is lit at Christmas Eve or Christmas Day.[6] The custom originated in family settings but has also become widespread in public worship.
        * from wikipedia.com

        Liked by 1 person

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