Write Your Memoirs Now

Tell your story

Let it roll from your mind like an avalanche

Mighty and intense

Driven by unstoppable forces

Knowing that if not you

No one

Will ever know the depth of joy and pain

It will be lost

Forever

Now is the opportune time to write your Memoirs. With Covid-19 keeping us from the many activities we used to do, you now have the time to reflect on your life. The shadow of death all around us reminds us that our mortality is not an ongoing thing. You can do it all and self-publish it yourself.

You might think you can’t remember all the details of the past enough to write a memoir. But, it is a lot easier than you might imagine. Take time to reflect on your life. Remember your family events, funny incidents, serious incidents, births, deaths, travels, school experiences, church experiences and many more. Think of the significant things that have affected your life and made you the person you are today. As you write, the memories come back and build on themselves.

When I wrote my childhood memoirs, I sat down and wrote one story each evening for thirty days. It was like writing a stream of consciousness poem. Write what ever comes to mind, you can edit later. You don’t need more than two or three pages each. Short stories are much easier for others to read.

Each day, I emailed my stories to all my family members. They enjoyed reading them and often sent tid-bits to add to the story or corrected my faulty memories. They were my editors! I have done four memoirs and self-published them since 2014.

Write your stories on your Word Processor. I used MS Word for mine. Use at least a #14 font. Save each one with a title. Then copy each one into an ongoing Memoir file that will become your book. You can include photos as well. Change everything to black and white. That keeps the cost much more reasonable. You can edit and move stories around as you choose.

When you are done with the stories, create a table of contents, and a title page with your personal publishing information on it. Make note that you reserve all rights to the content. You can make a copyright symbol with a ( a small c and )… (c).

Create a cover page file, with a title and a picture, if you like, and your name. Keep the title page on a separate file so that it can be printed on heavier paper.

Load your completed story and cover pdf.file on a flash drive. Take it to your local Office Supply store (Office Max/Office Depot) to get printed. They can print them in half size 4.25 x 5.5 and put a spiral binding on them. You can choose to get a clear plastic cover added as well. For 100 pages it can run $9 to $14 per book. Get at least twenty copies or more for the best price. It doesn’t cost that much more that getting ten. Watch for discount print coupons as well.

Do it for your grandchildren, do it for yourself. It is so rewarding when you are finished. Tell your story so that it is not forgotten in time. Give them to family and friends. They will thank you! You can also publish them as an e-book for free on Amazon Kindle.

***************

Photo of me and my older brother on our cistern with our pet goat!

Tonight is open link night at d’Verse Poets Pub. Join us at: https://dversepoets.com

You can check our some of my books on Amazon Kindle… just type in my name in the amazon search box and my books will come up. Click on my name in blue under my photo and all my books will come up!

97 thoughts on “Write Your Memoirs Now

  1. I love this idea, Dwight… You did mention it to me earlier as well, I remember….
    Memories are a gateway to the past… And no better way to go through those beautiful moments than the way you have explained. Thank you!! 💐❤️

    Liked by 5 people

  2. Great inspiration here. I might add to capture the memories of your elders. There are family stories my dad has been telling for years but they aren’t written down anywhere. Maybe this is the time for me to get them on paper while he can correct any mistakes.
    Thanks for the idea.
    Be well,
    Ali

    Liked by 6 people

  3. Love your encouragement and ideas, Dwight. 👏🏼 I wrote 50 personal stories last year, beginning in August and “finishing” in March. I started the project after my dad passed. The experience was cathartic and revealing; I highly recommend it. The number of stories doesn’t matter as the process of sitting, writing, remembering, and releasing. Maybe the stories are shared, maybe they are not. I was surprised by the detailed memories that came back to me when I allowed myself to be in that moment. Great post! ✍🏼😊

    Liked by 5 people

  4. You make a good point here. I used to write a diary when I was a kid/teenage, but really disliked that my family did not respect it as private. So I started writing poetry and essays that would make me remember the day without them been explicitly about my day —if that makes any sense.
    Your post made me rethink the subject. Maybe it’s time.

    Liked by 7 people

  5. Good Advice! I actually printed out my own booklets then paid to have them stapled together when i started writing again after my dad passed away many years ago.

    I generally use size #20 depending on the font on my computer because i read two pages on the screen at a time when writing on my computer. I also use Private Diary Pro, My Notes and Diaro on my tablet and phone.

    Liked by 6 people

  6. Wise words, such wise words. I have self published eighteen books of my poetry. I suspect the poems, along with many photographs and art within the books, say much about me, my life, the way I think …. all of it. I am leaving them behind for generations to follow. Perhaps by that time I will have published many more?

    Liked by 6 people

  7. Your poem is wonderful! More so are your suggestions for writing and printing. All my stuff is held captive in the computer. I did manage to do a book of poems for my siblings in 2016, but it ended up costing $26 per copy. I paid it for my siblings, because it was about growing up together, but I can’t afford to do that again.
    I’m going to keep your advice and pray about this. I have asked several people and get no answers. This just may be what I need.
    I journal every day for the past 7 years.

    Liked by 4 people

  8. Great poem Dwight and info. I just copied and pasted what you wrote in my notes. I started the blog to start my book that seems dead and buried when I revisit it. Then my blog takes so much time with writing and responding and then there is that thing called work and life so i never get to it like I want cuz i don’t know what I want to say anymore. I could have written a book with as many words as I’ve written. And all this sitting.. good damn thing my work makes me move.
    Any good ideas for “lost” would be appreciated! ❤️ Cindy

    Liked by 3 people

    • What I found was that when I began to write each evening it put me in the Zone and I found it to be a great stress reliever and relaxing, because it was fun to revisit all these memories! Start with the most familiar ones and the rest will come.
      Glad to be of help!. I understand about reading. It does take a lot of time.

      Liked by 1 person

    • When I was writing my first book, what I did was to devote time to focus on writing the boo any without distractions ( I used my phone to write too). I gave myself reasonable targets.
      You can set aside 20 to 40 minutes a day to compile/write contents. It doesn’t have to be long hours of ‘rigorous’ writing. Intentionality matters. Make up your mind and tell yourself that you can do it.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Wonderful advice, which reads as a rousing call to action. I love the practical tips too. I need to do my Grandma’s first, I think. She told me so many stories and I don’t want them to be lost to the world.

    Liked by 3 people

  10. Inspiring and a very methodical and bit by bit approach to being able to write a memoir. And even if not published, it would still be a very valuable treasure for ones family and other loved ones.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. I have been thinking about this a lot for quite a long time. There are so many memories lurking around that should have been captured in words by now. Can’t agree with you enough😊…do you share snippets of your memoirs in your blog?

    Liked by 3 people

  12. Wonderful idea, Dwight, and I know your family will cherish these memories you left them. “an avalanche might and intense” — perfect way of describing the examining and setting down of the past. Maybe that’s why some of us hesitate.

    Liked by 5 people

  13. Love this post….and the explanations that follow. I’ve been completing the Memories of Mom books I bought for each of my two children years ago but never got finished. It has fun pages like “what was in your Christmas stocking where you were little?” What did you like most about high school? What was the first bedroom you remember like and what were your favorite toys? One thing I’ve always wished I had was an oral history of both my mom and dad….interviews of them on tape. Photos tell a lot and jog our memories. But all the old black and white photos of them dating, their childhood etc….I wish I’d had them when they were alive and asked them to talk about them.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you Lillian! It seems our children are always too busy with life to think about these things until it is too late. Time to finish your memoirs for your grandchildren. It is not all that hared. If you can blog, you can self-publish!

      Like

  14. I started writing mine a few years ago. When I was abducted, writing it all down was a way for my mind to survive. Later, when I was horribly assaulted in my home by an intruder, I went through such a trying time. Like becoming a POW. But I finally found my strength to be a survivor.

    Liked by 2 people

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s